Inanimate Alice is used as an example of “internet art” at the Art Gallery, University of Maryland. The Art Gallery’s “Slow Reveal” -collection of links to internet art sites – was just launched yesterday.

Some of the context of internet art:

“Once the Internet emerged as a mass global communication network in the mid-1990s, artists quickly recognized the possibilities for creative innovation as well as the opportunity to question and redefine the conventions of art. The original term net.art referred to a certain group of artists: Vuk Ćosić, Jodi.org, Alexei Shulgin, Olia Lialina, and Heath Bunting, who identified themselves more as on-line activists.[1] The Internet created an opportunity for them to address some of the most pressing social and ethical issues of the day. As with cable and video in the mid-twentieth century, these artists began inserting themselves into the framework of the Internet while removing themselves from institutional art spaces.” {[1] For more information on early Internet Art, see Stallabrass, Julien. Internet art: online clash with culture and commerce. London: Tate Publishing, 2003.}

Of the works the Art Gallery links to, they say:

“The creators of digital narratives and their audience are responding to the tools of our time, in an attempt to make meaning of our everyday experiences.”

Inanimate Alice

NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED
19 February 2008

The nominations for the 2008 Learning on Screen Awards, which are organised by the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC), have been agreed by the panel of twelve distinguished judges.
The winners will be announced at the Learning on Screen Awards ceremony on 18 March at the National Science Learning Centre, University of York.”

Inanimate Alice has been nominated for the “GENERAL EDUCATION – Interactive Production” award!

More information is here.